History

Wouldn’t you know it… Obi’s Sister takes the time to pass out a gracious honor to your humble Robot and all he11 breaks loose around the homestead, causing the posting to be lighter than usual.

Thank you, Jedi Princess for making the ‘bot your featured blog this week. I’ll try to merit your confidence with some substantive posting as soon as time allows.

Meanwhile, here’s a little something from the email  grab bag…

Steve at Motor City Times has a great post today noting the similarities between today’s governmental encroachment on our freedoms, the bloated bureaucracy we deal with every day and the foreboding warnings from the father of our country.

I’ve written more than once on this very speech. George Washington was indeed a prophet and sayer of soothes.

As Steve points out:

On November 2nd, 2010, Americans will go to the polls for the most important mid-term election in years.  Politicians and professional punditry say this sort of thing every two years. However, things have changed.

With increasing frequency,  elected officials are acting less like representatives and more like members of a Junta.  Ask the Speaker of the House of Representatives where in the United States Constitution they get the authority to do X or Y and she scoffs at the question then arrogantly retorts with “are you serious?”

Yes, we are serious.

Damn skippy we are.

The founders studied these issues with an intensity we would do well to mimic and  strive to duplicate. Washington was prophetic in many things he spoke of in that speech. Almost every point he warned us of has come to pass.  As the Teacher points out in Ecclesiastes, “There is nothing new under the sun.” We would do well to remember this fact and to not discount the wisdom of the men who crafted this, the most unique and fair system of government ever conceived and implemented by man. So unique they believed as I do, that it was divinely inspired.

Steve has taken away several important points from Washington’s words that deserve your attention. Please take the time to read his reminder as to why we write and fight.

One doesn’t need to look far when searching for tangible results of Democrat social policy. As a matter of fact, you need only look to Detroit for a prime example of liberal social engineering and the destructive effect it has on a city. Once a thriving economy, Detroit has sadly become the poster child for “What Not to Do” when it comes to government, as Steve from Motor City Times tells us in this collection of posts documenting the once vibrant manufacturing center’s destruction by a government under 50 years of Liberal Democrat control.

Let’s not let this happen to America as a whole. Let’s learn the lessons of Detroit.

  1. The Liberal Art Community is Fascinated
  2. Video: Requiem For Detroit
  3. People Leaving Detroit
  4. After 50 Years of Democrat Leadership Detroit Needs a Task Force to Construct a Grocery Store
  5. Detroit is Murder City…Again
  6. Video: Detroit from the Air Looks Like A War Zone
  7. The Liberal Economy in Detroit
  8. Silver Bullet Solutions Rather Than Focus On Fundamentals
  9. Silver Bullet Solutions Rather Than Focus On Fundamentals part 2
  10. Life After People in Detroit

This list will also be duplicated on the Prime page as a reference.

Yes! It can be done.

If you’re like me, you have an interest in economics, but all the economic jargon thrown around gets a little confusing. With all of the news these days about the Wall Street takeovers, bank and insurance company bailouts, plus Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac doing whatever it is they weren’t supposed to, it helps to have the reference tools available to make sense of all that information.

That’s why I’m glad to know Mike, The Classic Liberal. He’s got  a B.A. in Finance and has professional experience as a stockbroker, entrepreneur, and bank officer. He also has a solid background in Austrian economics.

The CL has put together a small collection of posts that explain these seemingly complex issues in a way that’s easy for even a Mind-Numbed Robot to understand and for that, I’m thankful.

  1. What is Money (Currency)?
  2. Money (Currency) Inflation Explained
  3. Money, Inflation, and the Federal Reserve
  4. Inflation Illustrated
  5. Federal Reserve Bank: Counterfeiting Machine
  6. Fractional Reserve Banking: Money Out of Thin Air
  7. Possibility of Money Inflation in America
  8. The Very Real Threat of Currency Inflation
  9. Gold and Central Banks
  10. History of the Federal Reserve Bank

These links will be duplicated on the “Prime” page, but I first wanted to give you a heads up here on the front page.

Be sure to stop by Mikes place take a look around. There’s lots more where this came from.

Over the past eleven months, a recurring theme of mine has been to ruminate on the perils of big government and what we can do to combat the over reaching arm of federal encroachments on our liberty and freedom. Since some of you are new to the blog, and since I transferred quite a few of those essays from the old site yesterday, I thought I would take the opportunity to point you to the “Prime” tab which will hold links to those essays for your reference.

As an introduction, in reverse order of appearance, here are ten essays on

The Perils of Big Government


Note also that within the “Prime” tab are what I consider to be some of the best writing by other bloggers I’ve run across in my travels. I don’t always have time or think of bookmarking a post so the list is a bit short for now. Most of my time online lately is focused on defeating the Godzilla of a government we’ve been growing, so if your wondrous work is absent, please take no offense at the omission, it may be that I simply haven’t read that particular work or wasn’t in a situation where I was able to make a note. Either way, the fault I’m sure, lies with me.

In addition to the random readings titled “From Other Blogs,” my friends at The Resistance have been very busy assembling valuable information for us to use and peruse. Those links will be posted on “Prime” also as they come available. I will try to make a note of when I make an addition to the “Prime” tab here on the front page but do check out that page from time to time as I may have forgotten to make note. They don’t call me “Mind-Numbed” for nothing.

Worth watching again, and again.


This post began as a response in the comment section that soon took the form of a rant and hopefully now has been transformed into another, different rant. One that makes more sense and is less ummm, rant-like. I don’t know. You be the judge.

RightKlik, I know you had no intention of stirring me up with this comment on the latest post of the TBF poll but you’ve spurred my residual indignation over the passage of ObamaCare and given me an opportunity to compare it to it’s prostitute mother, *gasp* Social Security.

Here is RK’s comment:

For me, the candidates’ views on ObamaCare has served as a convenient way to identify the sharpest, most conservative candidates. Candidates who have a well thought-out strong statement on ObamaCare invariably seem to be great, well-rounded candidates.

RK, ObamaCare is a hot-button issue with me also. Like you, I try to judge candidates by their views on, and knowledge of the constitution. It’s going to take a well defined legal strategy to not only repeal Obamacare, but to also plan the chess game of how to win the greater war of reversing the trend to this selfish entitlement mentality Americans are growing more entranced by. (What is it with shiny objects?) ObamaCare is a direct product of such a mindset and we must not only defeat it in the congress, we’ve also got to turn public opinion and thinking away from the dependency attitude. People should feel like they are trusted with making their own destiny, not feel like they can’t do anything without a government handout.

True empowerment and a sense of personal pride come from self reliance, not waiting on government to guarantee a safety net or grant you permission.

Conservatives by definition resist change. They are reluctant to embrace political change because mostly in the last hundred years, progressives have infected political and economic thought on both sides of the aisle. Most times a piece of new legislation is proposed, whether it starts out with good intentions or not, it gets a ton of amendments and stipulations attached to it so that the original helpful piece of law is completely transformed into sometimes the exact opposite of the bill than they started with. Most times, in situations like we are in now, a Democrat majority, and even when the Republicans have the majority, there are too many RINO’s to stop the creep of socialism. The best true Conservatives can hope for has been to dig in their heels and slow the progress toward the cliff of socialism.

As a recent example, House Republican Leader John Boehner has been catching some flak lately over comments he made concerning the mother of all entitlements, Social Security, flak that upon closer review, doesn’t hold up to scrutiny.

Why, you ask?

Because given government’s penchant for redistributing your hard earned money, Boehner is right!

Boehner is right when he says the only option for Social Security to remain solvent, is to raise the retirement age to seventy, that is, if you want to save it without raising taxes even more. Given the Obama regime’s attack on working class Americans as demonstrated by their blatant hostility toward free enterprise and capitalism in general,  their lack of enforcement of immigration law, and outright denial of the federal laws’ existence in attacking Arizona’s attempt to seal it’s border, the only way to balance the books at the SS office is to raise taxes, decrease benefits or grant amnesty to 20 million illegal immigrants. Try to decrease benefits to the losers who haven’t put into the system and you’re labeled a racist, baby hating, xenophobe, so the only option the Obama regime offers is amnesty or higher taxes. Boehner correctly points this out when he recognizes the absurdity of increasing the retirement age of Americans who have paid into this failed Progressive Democrat plan that has had 85 years to get it right.

What makes anyone think they can do better with total control of health care?

How they keep selling this garbage to a government educated, academically challenged electorate is simple class envy and racism. Obama’s White House plays the class envy card so much that I’m forced to think it is the only ones in his hand or up his sleeve. Yet most in the media sadly and predictably, give him a free pass. Obama and the Democrats alike need to legalize the illegals en-masse because they see it as 1) an immediate 20m Democrats, and 2) using the new revenue stream as a way to prop up SS and the associated entitlements like medicare, welfare, etc. Never mind the fact the programs as they stand are flawed, broke and in dire need of reforming and reshaping for eventual transfer to the private sector.

Boehner is right because it is important to focus on why Social Security is insolvent. Social Security was and is the perfect ponsi scheme foisted upon the unsuspecting American people. A Three Card Monty with the “security card” taken off the table soon after the first shuffle. I see now that it was replaced with the “race card.”

Social Security is the prime example of the drawbacks of a true Democracy and the pandering it promotes. It resulted in a government run slush fund used to steal from every productive worker to give to the chosen. SS was proposed and passed by a progressive leaning congress, freshly educated/indoctrinated in Keynesian make-believe monetary schemes, deciding after passage, but knowing pre… that it, and the entitlement thinking it would spawn would become the greatest threat to liberty known to man. A Totalitarian Democracy enforced by aristocrats hell bent on protecting you from yourself at everyone else perceived expense.

Cornucopia Utopia.

Cornutopia!

All one has to do is look across the pond to the European failure in their Socialist experiment gone wild. Greece and the EU stand as a tarnished, rusty example of the degradation of socialist/communist political practice, lack of ethical behavior, outright corruption and the exposing of the absolute greed and selfishness that a true democracy fosters.

This is what inhabits not only the buildings of our capitol, but what infects the minds of the people who would enslave you by pushing the Democratic/ Progressive Socialist agenda. Obamacare, Cap and Trade, The Global Warming lie,  TARP, Stimulus, and government takeovers of private industry are all examples of why the solution to problems caused by a large, centralized federal government is not more government.

We’ve got a long road ahead folks. Let’s dig in by electing leaders with a belief in the Constitutional Republic we were meant to inherit.

Democracies fail. Always have, always will. They eat themselves from the inside out.

A maggot has no thought of what it  eats. It only knows the innate hunger. The lust for power is no different.

UPDATE: My friend Bob Belvedere has posted commentary to a post by Si Vis Pacem, and surprisingly, or not, they have been discussing some of the same points I brought up here. That being, we deplore the term Democracy as applied to the USA. I highly recommend both reads.

And remember, The U.S.A. is a Constitutional Republic. Thank you.

The Background

In October of last year I embarked on a project, chronicling the US Constitution and the damage inflicted upon it from our federal government. The result at the time was a top twenty list, re-published below. I realize now, upon review, that I left out the 16th Amendment which established the Federal Income Tax and now have revised the list to include it, making it a Top 21 list. So be it.

In compiling the list, I assembled a spread sheet called the Timeline of US Constitutional Decline. I’ve since converted it to a stand alone page, sans any WordPress formatting, as I think that would make the reference harder to use.

The Proposal

What I have in mind is to offer the worksheet to you, with the request that as you use the reference, if you have written a piece on a given subject that would shed a defining light on it, or you know of a piece already written, to please let me know and I’ll review it, and include it in the next update of the comments column of the time-line. All you need to do is send me an email or leave a comment on this page with a link. (The new page is not interactive.)

Some might wonder why post the reference at all? The answer is, I just couldn’t let it languish in the bowels of my hard drive if someone else might find some use of it. If you have any other ideas, let’s hear them!

In closing, I hope you find it as useful in your quest for the true history of our great nation as I did, and still do.

You’ll find the link to the new page in the upper right, just below the masthead labeled “US Timeline”. The link to the new timeline is on that page along with the original post.

Cheers! ~ Robot

UPDATE: Link to timeline page fixed. Sorry ’bout that. Gremlins is my story, and I’m sticking to it. Thought I double checked those links. Now I gotta check the other page too.

Happy Fathers Day!

I think it appropriate, relevant and essential to hear from the Father of our Country today. The address may seem a tad long but I think in context, the fact that it would be his last address to the American people is reason enough to opine at length on matters close to his heart and soul, and ours.

George Washington

Farewell Address (September 19, 1796)

In one of the most famous addresses in American history, Washington declines to seek a third term as President, and he thanks the American people for entrusting him with the position. He calls on American citizens to remain patriotic and unified despite their differences and to avoid “permanent Alliances” with other nations. Washington released this address to newspapers around the countries but he never presented it in person before any assembly.

Transcript

The period for a new election of a citizen to administer the Executive Government of the United States being not far distant, and the time actually arrived when your thoughts must be employed in designating the person who is to be clothed with that important trust, it appears to me proper, especially as it may conduce to a more distinct expression of the public voice, that I should now apprise you of the resolution I have formed to decline being considered among the number of those out of whom a choice is to be made.

I beg you at the same time to do me the justice to be assured that this resolution has not been taken without a strict regard to all the considerations appertaining to the relation which binds a dutiful citizen to his country; and that in withdrawing the tender of service, which silence in my Situation might imply, I am influenced by no diminution of zeal for your future interest, no deficiency of grateful respect for your past kindness, but am supported by a full conviction that the step is compatible with both.

The acceptance of and continuance hitherto in the office to which your suffrages have twice called me have been a uniform sacrifice of inclination to the opinion of duty and to a deference for what appeared to be your desire. I constantly hoped that it would have been much earlier in my power, consistently with motives which I was not at liberty to disregard, to return to that retirement from which I had been reluctantly drawn. The strength of my inclination to do this previous to the last election had even led to the preparation of an address to declare it to you; but mature reflection on the then perplexed and critical posture of our affairs with foreign nations and the unanimous advice of persons entitled to my confidence impelled me to abandon the idea. I rejoice that the state of your concerns, external as well as internal, no longer renders the pursuit of inclination incompatible with the sentiment of duty or propriety, and am persuaded, whatever partiality may be retained for my services, that in the present circumstances of our country you will not disapprove my determination to retire.

The impressions with which I first undertook the arduous trust were explained on the proper occasion. In the discharge of this trust I will only say that I have, with good intentions, contributed toward the organization and administration of the Government the best exertions of which a very fallible judgment was capable, Not unconscious in the outset of the inferiority of my qualifications, experience in my own eyes, perhaps still more in the eyes of others, has strengthened the motives to diffidence of myself; and every day the increasing weight of years admonishes me more and more that the shade of retirement is as necessary to me as it will be welcome. Satisfied that if any circumstances have given peculiar value to my services they were temporary, I have the consolation to believe that, while choice and prudence invite me to quit the political scene, patriotism does not forbid it.

In looking forward to the moment which is intended to terminate the career of my political life my feelings do not permit me to suspend the deep acknowledgment of that debt of gratitude which I owe to my beloved country for the many honors it has conferred upon me; still more for the steadfast confidence with which it has supported me, and for the opportunities I have thence enjoyed of manifesting my inviolable attachment by services faithful and persevering, though in usefulness unequal to my zeal. If benefits have resulted to our country from these services, let it always be remembered to your praise and as an instructive example in our annals that under circumstances in which the passions, agitated in every direction, were liable to mislead; amidst appearances sometimes dubious; vicissitudes of fortune often discouraging; in situations in which not unfrequently want of success has countenanced the spirit of criticism, the constancy of your support was the essential prop of the efforts and a guaranty of the plans by which they were effected. Profoundly penetrated with this idea, I shall carry it with me to my grave as a strong incitement to unceasing vows that Heaven may continue to you the choicest tokens of its beneficence; that your union and brotherly affection may be perpetual; that the free Constitution which is the work of your hands may be sacredly maintained; that its administration in every department may be stamped with wisdom and virtue; that, in fine, the happiness of the people of these States, under the auspices of liberty, may be made complete by so careful a preservation and so prudent a use of this blessing as will acquire to them the glory of recommending it to the applause, the affection, and adoption of every nation which is yet a stranger to it.

Here, perhaps, I ought to stop. But a solicitude for your welfare which can not end but with my life, and the apprehension of danger natural to that solicitude, urge me on an occasion like the present to offer to your solemn contemplation and to recommend to your frequent review some sentiments which are the result of much reflection, of no inconsiderable observation, and which appear to me all important to the permanency of your felicity as a people. These will be offered to you with the more freedom as you can only see in them the disinterested warnings of a parting friend, who can possibly have no personal motive to bias his counsel. Nor can I forget as an encouragement to it your indulgent reception of my sentiments on a former and not dissimilar occasion.

Interwoven as is the love of liberty with every ligament of your hearts, no recommendation of mine is necessary to fortify or confirm the attachment.

The unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your real independence, the support of your tranquillity at home, your peace abroad, of your safety, of your prosperity, of that very liberty which you so highly prize. But as it is easy to foresee that from different causes and from different quarters much pains will be taken, many artifices employed, to weaken in your minds the conviction of this truth, as this is the point in your political fortress against which the batteries of internal and external enemies will be most constantly and actively (though often covertly and insidiously) directed, it is of infinite moment that you should properly estimate the immense value of your national union to your collective and individual happiness; that you should cherish a cordial, habitual, and immovable attachment to it; accustoming yourselves to think and speak of it as of the palladium of your political safety and prosperity; watching for its preservation with jealous anxiety; discountenancing whatever may suggest even a suspicion that it can in any event be abandoned, and indignantly frowning upon the first dawning of every attempt to alienate any portion of our country from the rest or to enfeeble the sacred ties which now link together the various parts.

For this you have every inducement of sympathy and interest. Citizens by birth or choice of a common country, that country has a right to concentrate your affections. The name of American, which belongs to you in your national capacity, must always exalt the just pride of patriotism more than any appellation derived from local discriminations. With slight shades of difference, you have the same religion, manners, habits, and political principles. You have in a common cause fought and triumphed together. The independence and liberty you possess are the work of joint councils and joint efforts, of common dangers, sufferings, and successes.

But these considerations, however powerfully they address themselves to your sensibility, are greatly outweighed by those which apply more immediately to your interest. Here every portion of our country finds the most commanding motives for carefully guarding and preserving the union of the whole.

The North, in an unrestrained intercourse with the South, protected by the equal laws of a common government, finds in the productions of the latter great additional resources of maritime and commercial enterprise and precious materials of manufacturing industry. The South, in the same intercourse, benefiting by the same agency of the North, sees its agriculture grow and its commerce expand. Turning partly into its own channels the seamen of the North, it finds its particular navigation invigorated; and while it contributes in different ways to nourish and increase the general mass of the national navigation, it looks forward to the protection of a maritime strength to which itself is unequally adapted. The East, in a like intercourse with the West, already finds, and in the progressive improvement of interior communications by land and water will more and more find, a valuable vent for the commodities which it brings from abroad or manufactures at home. The West derives from the East supplies requisite to its growth and comfort, and what is perhaps of still greater consequence, it must of necessity owe the secure enjoyment of indispensable outlets for its own productions to the weight, influence, and the future maritime strength of the Atlantic side of the Union, directed by an indissoluble community of interest as one nation. Any other tenure by which the West can hold this essential advantage, whether derived from its own separate strength or from an apostate and unnatural connection with any foreign power, must be intrinsically precarious.

While, then, every part of our country thus feels an immediate and particular interest in union, all the parts combined can not fail to find in the united mass of means and efforts greater strength, greater resource, proportionably greater security from external danger, a less frequent interruption of their peace by foreign nations, and what is of inestimable value, they must derive from union an exemption from those broils and wars between themselves which so frequently afflict neighboring countries not tied together by the same governments, which their own rivalships alone would be sufficient to produce, but which opposite foreign alliances, attachments, and intrigues would stimulate and imbitter. Hence, likewise, they will avoid the necessity of those overgrown military establishments which, under any form of government, are inauspicious to liberty, and which are to be regarded as particularly hostile to republican liberty. In this sense it is that your union ought to be considered as a main prop of your liberty, and that the love of the one ought to endear to you the preservation of the other.

These considerations speak a persuasive language to every reflecting and virtuous mind, and exhibit the continuance of the union as a primary object of patriotic desire. Is there a doubt whether a common government can embrace so large a sphere? Let experience solve it. To listen to mere speculation in such a case were criminal. We are authorized to hope that a proper organization of the whole, with the auxiliary agency of governments for the respective subdivisions, will afford a happy issue to the experiment. It is well worth a fair and full experiment. With such powerful and obvious motives to union affecting all parts of our country, while experience shall not have demonstrated its impracticability, there will always be reason to distrust the patriotism of those who in any quarter may endeavor to weaken its bands.

In contemplating the causes which may disturb our union it occurs as matter of serious concern that any ground should have been furnished for characterizing parties by geographical discriminations–Northern and Southern, Atlantic and Western– whence designing men may endeavor to excite a belief that there is a real difference of local interests and views. One of the expedients of party to acquire influence within particular districts is to misrepresent the opinions and aims of other districts. You can not shield yourselves too much against the jealousies and heartburnings which spring from these misrepresentations; they tend to render alien to each other those who ought to be bound together by fraternal affection. The inhabitants of our Western country have lately had a useful lesson on this head. They have seen in the negotiation by the Executive and in the unanimous ratification by the Senate of the treaty with Spain, and in the universal satisfaction at that event throughout the United States, a decisive proof how unfounded were the suspicions propagated among them of a policy in the General Government and in the Atlantic States unfriendly to their interests in regard to the Mississippi. They have been witnesses to the formation of two treaties that with Great Britain and that with Spain–which secure to them everything they could desire in respect to our foreign relations toward confirming their prosperity. Will it not be their wisdom to rely for the preservation of these advantages on the union by which they were procured? Will they not henceforth be deaf to those advisers, if such there are, who would sever them from their brethren and connect them with aliens?

To the efficacy and permanency of your union a government for the whole is indispensable. No alliances, however strict, between the parts can be an adequate substitute. They must inevitably experience the infractions and interruptions which all alliances in all times have experienced. Sensible of this momentous truth, you have improved upon your first essay by the adoption of a Constitution of Government better calculated than your former for an intimate union and for the efficacious management of your common concerns. This Government, the offspring of our own choice, uninfluenced and unawed, adopted upon full investigation and mature deliberation, completely free in its principles, in the distribution of its powers, uniting security with energy, and containing within itself a provision for its own amendment, has a just claim to your confidence and your support. Respect for its authority, compliance with its laws, acquiescence in its measures, are duties enjoined by the fundamental maxims of true liberty. The basis of our political systems is the right of the people to make and to alter their constitutions of government. But the constitution which at any time exists till changed by an explicit and authentic act of the whole people is sacredly obligatory upon all. The very idea of the power and the right of the people to establish government presupposes the duty of every individual to obey the established government.

All obstructions to the execution of the laws, all combinations and associations, under whatever plausible character, with the real design to direct, control, counteract, or awe the regular deliberation and action of the constituted authorities, are destructive of this fundamental principle and of fatal tendency. They serve to organize faction; to give it an artificial and extraordinary force; to put in the place of the delegated will of the nation the will of a party, often a small but artful and enterprising minority of the community, and, according to the alternate triumphs of different parties, to snake the public administration the mirror of the ill-concerted and incongruous projects of faction rather than the organ of consistent and wholesome plans, digested by common counsels and modified by mutual interests.

However combinations or associations of the above description may now and then answer popular ends, they are likely in the course of time and things to become potent engines by which cunning, ambitious, and unprincipled men will be enabled to subvert the power of the people, and to usurp for themselves the reins of government, destroying. afterwards the very engines which have lifted them to unjust dominion.

Toward the preservation of your Government and the permanency of your present happy state, it is requisite not only that you steadily discountenance irregular oppositions to its acknowledged authority, but also that you resist with care the spirit of innovation upon its principles, however specious the pretexts. One method of assault may be to effect in the forms of the Constitution alterations which will impair the energy of the system, and thus to undermine what can not be directly overthrown. In all the changes to which you may be invited remember that time and habit are at least as necessary to fix the true character of governments as of other human institutions; that experience is the surest standard by which to test the real tendency of the existing constitution of a country; that facility in changes upon the credit of mere hypothesis and opinion exposes to perpetual change, from the endless variety of hypothesis and opinion; and remember especially that for the efficient management of your common interests in a country so extensive as ours a government of as much vigor as is consistent with the perfect security of liberty is indispensable. Liberty itself will find in such a government, with powers properly distributed and adjusted, its surest guardian. It is, indeed, little else than a name where the government is too feeble to withstand the enterprises of faction, to confine each member of the society within the limits prescribed by the laws, and to maintain all in the secure and tranquil enjoyment of the rights of person and property.

Read the rest of this entry »

Steve over at Motor City Times has a new post that hit on something I’ve been pondering for quite a while. If most people can agree that big corporations and big unions are wielding too much clout with our politicians, then why in the world do we keep feeding the monster? Shut off the freaking food supply!

Corporations and unions should be cut out of campaign contributions altogether! Campaigns should be funded by contributions from the US Citizen only. And don’t give me any of that “it’s too expensive to run a campaign” garbage. The politicians made the rules. They can revise them so that it is less conducive to corruption.

I know, now I’m going to hear what a naive and unrealistic proposition that is. Fine. I’m naive. I’ll have you know that that is one of my most endearing qualities. Naive is one of the best things you can be sometimes. It helps the creative process to look at something with a childlike curiosity and wonder.

What I’m wondering right now is why we keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting a different result. That, according to Einstein if I remember correctly, is the definition of insanity.

Next subject.

I’ve seen an idea I floated a while back gaining some traction of late. This is encouraging. The idea is to REPEAL THE SEVENTEENTH AMENDMENT. Hear! Hear!

Wait, let me go check when it was I wrote about it… I’m back. It was March, at the other blog, in a post titled Aristocracy and Oligarchy – How We Got Here. In the comments of that post, The CL and Smitty proposed the excellent ideas of also repealing the Sixteenth and The Federal Reserve Act. Now you’re talkin’ some change I can believe in!

Now, these two proposals are admittedly lofty ideals and for sure not doable in the immediate future, and as Gene Healy points out, the 17th repeal in and of itself would be of minimal use without further regressive action. Regression is not necessarily a bad thing when it comes to removing power from a Federal government that has grown beyond its constitutionally limited bounds.

We may not be able to affect that change at the moment, but I believe it is a needed discussion for when we once again have conservatives in the wheelhouse of our ship of state.

A day to remember

BAGHDAD, Iraq — Master Sgt. Timothy Deramus clinches the U.S. flag during a Veterans Day ceremony at Camp Sather here Nov. 11. Sergeant Deramus is an information manager deployed from Luke Air Force Base, Ariz., and is the noncommissioned officer in charge of the camp’s honor guard detail. (U.S. Air Force photo by Tech. Sgt. Michael O’Connor)


Image and description via http://www.af.mil/weekinphotos/041112-10.html

The flag is more than a symbol. It’s a piece of home and a reminder to the brave soldiers of what they fight for and should remind us all of those who defend us.

Lately, I’ve sensed an undercurrent in the blogosphere, a small rift between a few well reasoned bloggers trading barbs pertaining to the “isms” of Conservative and Libertarian. While I don’t presume to know the minds of said thinkers, I will offer a quick thought on the topic. Perhaps someone fresh into the fray can offer a new perspective or a reminder as to a common goal.

In describing methods of rule or governance, some scholars have done so pictorially, using a line with anarchy on one end and tyranny on the other. They go on to break the line into levels of governance, such as monarchy, theocracy, democracy, communism, socialism etc., as they reside on the line of how much or how little government and what type it is. A friend once told me, when we were discussing the difference between Conservative and Libertarian thought, that he sees his role as a Libertarian as to pull for the least possible government in order to balance the extreme left’s argument for the most government. This, in my thinking, would place Conservatives just to the left of Libertarians on that line, but at least standing side by side.

This is the tug of war we find ourselves in, with many factions of thought hanging on to the same rope, each of them tugging with differing amount of force. It has always been the case to some extent. Hamilton and Jefferson were at odds over the allowable reach of Federal government, arguing some of the same points we wrangle with today. Jefferson and Adams also, close friends as they were, found themselves divided in the middle of their lives over their basic beliefs, at last to reach a sketchy reconciliation in their later years through a famous series of letters.

All this is to say that it would be a shame for such a fissure to develop between the Libertarian and Conservative camps at this moment in time. The way I see it, if you and I are holding the same rope, and we are pulling in the same direction against an opponent, there is no intelligent way for me to justify turning around to face you and begin pulling the other way. To do so only helps our common enemy.

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May 2021
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