Helpful info on tomorrow’s Constitutional Amendment Elections from the Southeast Texas TEA Party:
Texas Constitutional Elections do not get much publicity. No one is on the ballot. We are not voting for President or a Congressman. Who cares,  right?
Constitutional Amendment Elections are actually VERY important. We are CHANGING the Texas Constitution!
This year’s Constitutional Amendment Election is on Tuesday November 8th, 2011.
There are 10 propositions on the ballot this year.
Below is a list and explanation (from the Texas Secretary of State website) of the propositions that you will see on the ballot when you go to your polling location to vote.
Also, below you will find an awesome graph from Parker County Blog.
This graph shows the Voting Recommendations from Conservative Organizations in Texas
As you can see from the graph, the conservative organizations in Texas are AGAINST most of the propositions on the ballot. Proposition 1 is the only proposition that most conservative organizations are in favor of. Proposition 10 has a pretty neutral recommendation so that one is a tossup. The rest of the propositions are generally seen as bad propositions by the majority of the conservative organizations.
Everyone of course should investigate the propositions and make their own determinations of how they should vote. This is just a guide
Explanatory Statements for the November 8, 2011 Texas Constitutional Amendment Election

Proposition Number 1 (SJR 14)
SJR 14 would amend the constitution to authorize the legislature to provide the surviving spouse of a 100 percent or totally disabled veteran with an exemption from ad valorem taxation of all or part of the market value of the surviving spouse’s residence homestead as long as the surviving spouse has not remarried, the property was the residence homestead of the surviving spouse when the qualifying veteran died, and the property remains the residence homestead of the surviving spouse.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows:  “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to provide for an exemption from ad valorem taxation of all or part of the market value of the residence homestead of the surviving spouse of a 100 percent or totally disabled veteran.”
Proposition Number 2 (SJR 4)
SJR 4 would amend the constitution to authorize the Texas Water Development Board to issue additional general obligation bonds on a continuing basis for one or more accounts of the Texas Water Development Fund II, with the restriction that the total amount of bonds outstanding at any time does not exceed $6 billion.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows:  “The constitutional amendment providing for the issuance of additional general obligation bonds by the Texas Water Development Board in an amount not to exceed $6 billion at any time outstanding.”
Proposition Number 3 (SJR 50)
SJR 50 would amend the constitution to authorize the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board or its successors to issue and sell general obligation bonds on a continuing basis for the purpose of financing educational loans for students, subject to certain constitutional restrictions, including a restriction as to the maximum principal amount of bonds outstanding at any one time.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows:  “The constitutional amendment providing for the issuance of general obligation bonds of the State of Texas to finance educational loans to students.”
Proposition Number 4 (HJR 63)
HJR 63 would amend the constitution to authorize the legislature to permit a county to issue bonds or notes to finance the development or redevelopment of an unproductive, underdeveloped, or blighted area within the county, and to pledge increases in ad valorem tax revenues imposed on property in the area by the county for repayment of such bonds or notes.  The amendment does not provide independent authority for increasing ad valorem tax rates.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows:  “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to permit a county to issue bonds or notes to finance the development or redevelopment of an unproductive, underdeveloped, or blighted area and to pledge for repayment of the bonds or notes increases in ad valorem taxes imposed by the county on property in the area.  The amendment does not provide authority for increasing ad valorem tax rates.”
Proposition Number 5 (SJR 26)
SJR 26 would amend the constitution to authorize the legislature to allow cities and counties to enter into interlocal contracts with other cities and counties without having to assess an ad valorem tax and set aside a specified amount of funds for the payment of costs under the interlocal contract.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to allow cities or counties to enter into interlocal contracts with other cities or counties without the imposition of a tax or the provision of a sinking fund.”
Proposition Number 6 (HJR 109)
HJR 109 would amend the constitution to increase the amount of principal that is available for withdrawal from the permanent school fund each year and would also clarify certain references to that fund in the constitution.  Increased access to the principal of the state public education trust fund would be based upon HJR 109 granting the authority to consider alternative market calculations when determining the amount of principal that is available for distribution to the available school fund.  HJR 109 would also provide authority to distribute to the available school fund annual revenue from school fund land or other properties up to $300 million per year.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows:  “The constitutional amendment clarifying references to the permanent school fund, allowing the General Land Office to distribute revenue from permanent school fund land or other properties to the available school fund to provide additional funding for public education, and providing for an increase in the market value of the permanent school fund for the purpose of allowing increased distributions from the available school fund.”
Proposition Number 7 (SJR 28)
SJR 28 would amend the constitution by adding El Paso County to the list of counties authorized to create conservation and reclamation districts to develop parks and recreational facilities financed by taxes.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows: “The constitutional amendment authorizing the legislature to permit conservation and reclamation districts in El Paso County to issue bonds supported by ad valorem taxes to fund the development and maintenance of parks and recreational facilities.”
Proposition Number 8 (SJR 16)
SJR 16 would amend the constitution by requiring the legislature to provide for taxation of open space land devoted to water stewardship purposes on the basis of its productive capacity.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows:  “The constitutional amendment providing for the appraisal for ad valorem tax purposes of open-space land devoted to water-stewardship purposes on the basis of its productive capacity.”
Proposition Number 9 (SJR 9)
SJR 9 would amend the constitution to authorize the governor, on the written recommendation and advice of the Board of Pardons and Paroles, to grant a pardon, reprieve, or commutation of punishment to a person who successfully completes a term of deferred adjudication community supervision.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows:  “The constitutional amendment authorizing the governor to grant a pardon to a person who successfully completes a term of deferred adjudication community supervision.”
Proposition Number 10 (SJR 37)
SJR 37 would amend the constitution by extending the length of the unexpired term that causes the automatic resignation of certain local elected officeholders if they announce candidacy or become candidates for another office from one year to one year and 30 days.
The proposed amendment would appear on the ballot as follows: “The constitutional amendment to change the length of the unexpired term that causes the automatic resignation of certain elected county or district officeholders if they become candidates for another office.
As a side note, I particularly liked a comment from Senator-Blutarski at Parker County Blog:

Senator-Blutarsky says:

If I voted today, I would vote NO on every one.

In a rare moment of honesty and candor from LBJ, this holds very true-

“You do not examine legislation in the light of the
benefits it will convey if properly administered, but
in the light of the wrongs it would do and the harms
it would cause if improperly administered.”

~~ Lyndon B. Johnson ~~

Comments
  • marissa November 7, 2011 at 3:43 pm

    No on all ten! And no on both bond proposals if you’re in Travis County!

  • Kid November 7, 2011 at 10:11 pm

    We’ve got 1 in Ohio, keep oblabbercare out. I’ll of course vote yes, keep that lump of satan bile.
    The other thing being voted on is to keep SB5 which will throttle the unions from be allowed to pretend there are never recessions or depressions on the backs of taxpayers. I’ll be voting to keep that sucker on the books.

    Tomorrow’s results will tell us a lot about America’s focus.

  • The Quilter November 9, 2011 at 1:22 am

    Thanks for providing your little red/black chart! I was not very informed and it was a big help!

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